The goal of the Association is to serve as a liaison between retired faculty, AAPs, staff and the University, support its emeriti members' professional endeavors through non-competitive grants, facilitate social ties through lectures, tours, and cultural activities, provide volunteering opportunities, and reach out to the community through the Learning Community Program.


SPRING 2019 GU LEARNING COMMUNITY COURSES

Course Descriptions

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Campus map here


 

 

ANTHONY J. TAMBASCO

Professor Emeritus, Department of Theology
Specializing in Biblical Studies

Miracles: Reframing the Discussion in a World of Science

Tuesday, March 19 and 26, April 2: 10:30–12:00
McShain Lounge, small (McCarthy Hall)

 

PAUL LILLY

Professor Emeritus, State University of New York at Oneonta, NY

Walt Whitman and Emily Dickinson

Thursday, March 28, April 4, 11: 10:30–12:00
McShain Lounge, small (McCarthy Hall)

 

 

SUSAN F. MARTIN

Donald G. Herzberg Professor Emerita of International Migration, School of Foreign Service

Global Trends in International Migration

Monday, March 4, and Wednesday, March 6: 2–4 p.m.
McShain Lounge, large (McCarthy Hall)

NOTE: This course meets twice, during the same week, each time for a two-hour session.

 

PIERCE S. CORDEN

Adviser, Holy See Mission to the UN, retired US and international organization arms control official

Nuclear Weapons, Arms Control, and Global Stability

Monday, March 11, 18, 25: 2– 3:30
Murray Room, Lauinger Library, 5th floor

 

 

SUZANNE BRONHEIM

Adjunct Associate Research Professor of Pediatrics

Cultural Competence: Living, Working, and Volunteering in our Multicultural Society

Tuesday, April 16: 2:00–3:30; McShain Lounge, small (McCarthy Hall)
Tuesday, April 23, 30: 2:00–3:30, McShain Lounge, large (McCarthy Hall)

 

LINDA WETZEL

Associate Professor, Emerita, Department of Philosophy

Contemporary Philosophy of Mind

Wednesday, April 10, 17, 24, 2–3:30 pm
Murray Room, Lauinger Library, 5th floor

 

 


ANTHONY J. TAMBASCO

Professor Emeritus, Department of Theology
Specializing in Biblical Studies 

Miracles: Reframing the Discussion in a World of Science

Tuesday, March 19 and 26, and April 2: 10:30–12 pm
McShain Lounge, small (McCarthy Hall)

A secular and scientific world tends to dismiss miracles as incompatible with modern perspectives. Such challenges often lead Christians to think they must hold science and faith apart as irreconcilable with each other. This course will consider ways of understanding miracles that also respect a scientific worldview.


PAUL LILLY
Professor Emeritus, State University of New York at Oneonta, NY

Walt Whitman and Emily Dickinson

Thursday, March 28, April 4, and 11: 10:30–12 pm
McShain Lounge, small (McCarthy Hall)

America's two finest poets are basking under a recent spotlight--a scholar discovered that Whitman wrote a novel, and a film based on Dickinson was favorably reviewed. For the first class, we will look at these sections of Whitman's Song of Myself: Numbers 1, 2, 3, 5, 6, 8,11, 20, 21, 24, 32, 48, 51, 52. The 1881-1882 edition is preferable, but any will do. The second class will discuss selections from Whitman's Drum Taps, and six poems by Dickinson. The final class will look at six more of Dickinson, and an opportunity to read aloud your favorite Dickinson poem. The best way to locate a poem is the short version of Thomas Johnson's The Poems of Emily Dickinson


SUSAN F. MARTIN
Donald G. Herzberg Professor Emerita of International Migration, School of Foreign Service

Global Trends in International Migration 

Monday, March 4, and Wednesday, March 6: 2–4 p.m.
McShain Lounge, large (McCarthy Hall)
NOTE: This course meets twice, during the same week, each time for a two-hour session.  

Worldwide, international migration is a large and growing phenomenon, with almost 260 million people now living outside of their home countries for extended periods. It is also one of the most controversial issues on the public policy agenda. Understanding the complex dynamics behind international migration is essential to improved policies and programs to address the multiple causes and consequences of these movements of people. This course provides an overview of international migration numbers and trends; examines the complex drivers that affect voluntary, forced, and mixed migration; analyzes the impact of international migration on source and receiving countries; and introduces participants to policy challenges at the national, regional, and global level. Throughout, the connections between migration and such other transnational issues as security, development, and environmental change are discussed.


PIERCE S. CORDEN
Adviser, Holy See Mission to the UN, retired US and international organization arms control official 

Nuclear Weapons, Arms Control, and Global Stability 

Monday, March 11, 18, and 25: 2–3:30 pm
Murray Room, Lauinger Library, 5th floor 

As weapons technology and that of delivery systems evolved from the nineteenth century, the use of chemical weapons in World War I, the availability of aircraft to drop explosive weapons in urban areas, and the appearance of ballistic missiles prefaced or enabled the use of nuclear weapons at the end of WW II and the subsequent arms race and proliferation of nuclear weapons. Efforts to reverse the race and stop proliferation emerged immediately after WW II, and are embodied in agreements that constrain or eliminate nuclear weapons and delivery systems.  Despite successes, today the US–Russian Intermediate Nuclear Force Treaty may be abrogated; the US has withdrawn its support for the Joint Comprehensive Program of Action with Iran; and initial efforts to reverse proliferation in North Korea and denuclearize the Korean Peninsula have faltered. Pope Francis has said that nuclear deterrence and the possession of nuclear weapons are unacceptable: this is a serious challenge to the present international order. The course will survey the evolution of weapons and constraints, discuss the current situation and consider the way forward.


SUZANNE BRONHEIM
Adjunct Associate Research Professor of Pediatrics 

Dr. Bronheim was a Senior Policy Analyst within Georgetown University Center for Child and Human Development (GUCCHD). As faculty within the National Center for Cultural Competence (NCCC), she was the Director of the Sudden Unexpected Infant and Child Death and Pregnancy Loss Project within the NCCC for 15 years. For over ten years, she coordinated Communities Can!, a national network of communities dedicated to using systems integration strategies to support and serve all children and families, including those with or at risk for special health care needs. 

Cultural Competence: Living, Working, and Volunteering in our Multicultural Society 

Tuesday, April 16: 2-3:30 pm; McShain Lounge, small (McCarthy Hall)
Tuesday, April 23: 2-3:30 pm; McShain Lounge, large (McCarthy Hall)

Cross-cultural interactions can be fascinating and frustrating. It takes a set of attitudes, knowledge and skills to successfully navigate these interactions in daily life, in work and in volunteer activities. Much of the conflict in our country today can be understood as difficulties in cross-cultural relating. In this course we will explore the concept of culture beyond the typical categories of race, ethnicity or nationality and explore ourselves as cultural beings. Through discussion, case studies, and lecture we will understand the concept of cultural competence, the related issue of implicit bias, and how this knowledge can improve our cross-cultural interactions.


LINDA WETZEL
Associate Professor, Emerita, Department of Philosophy 

Contemporary Philosophy of Mind 

Wednesday, April 10, 17, 24, 2–3:30 pm
Murray Room, Lauinger Library, 5th floor 

What are minds? Are they physical or non-physical? If non-physical, how do they interact with the physical to push the world (of neurons) around? If minds are physical objects, what color are they and how much do they weigh? Or perhaps there are no such things as minds, and the real question is: what is it to be minded? Is it to have an immaterial soul? To behave in a certain way? To have a certain sort of brain? To run a certain sort of program? Could a robot be minded? Another way to put the question is: In virtue of what are statements about a person’s mental life—her hopes and fears—true? States of her soul, her brain, her dispositions to outward behavior or the program she is running? Or perhaps even this is misguided. Perhaps statements about hopes and fears are not strictly speaking true, and a mature cognitive science will not refer to them at all. If time permits, we will consider: Are mental states identical to brain states? Are mental states reducible to brain states? What sort of business is reduction? What are emergent properties and are there any? What, if anything, is special about the subjective point of view? Are conscious experiences physiologically understandable? What are representations and how can a brain represent the world outside itself?


Register here!